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In a nutshell, the process of root canal treatment first removes (as thoroughly as possible) bacteria, nerve tissue, the organic debris left over from the breakdown of nerve tissue, and bacterial toxins out from within the inner aspects of a tooth (the area originally occupied by the tooth’s nerve tissue). All of these items either are or will produce the tissue irritants that can cause your body to activate an inflammation reaction. Subsequently, once this space has been cleansed root canal treatment involves filling in and sealing off the interior of the tooth. This is done as a means of minimizing the possibility that bacteria will be able to re-colonize the inner aspects of the tooth or that the interior of the tooth can fill in with tissue fluid that could become stagnant and subsequently break down. (Either of these situations could produce a state of persistent inflammation in the bone that surrounds the tooth’s root.) The seal also contains and encapsulates any debris that could not be fully removed during the cleaning aspect of the root canal treatment process so that it can’t leak out and trigger an inflammation reaction.