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Whenever a tooth is lost or extracted a considerable amount of the bone that once surrounded the remaining root portion may disappear. This loss can be particularly rapid during the first few months and is described as ‘bone resorption’. Although the rate and amount of bone resorption is highly variable between individuals, it will always occur to some extent, unless specific care is taken to reduce its effects. Sometimes, the simplest measure to minimise bone loss after an extraction is to place the dental implants immediately or within the first few weeks.

Dentures – Many patients report that after a while their dentures become progressively looser and do not fit as well as they once did. Initially the increased rate of bone loss following extractions is responsible for the observed deterioration of denture fit. Over the long-term it is the direct effect of chewing forces that causes slow resorption of supporting bone. Most people who have had dentures for many years will have needed a reline procedure to compensate for this bone loss. Therefore the longer dentures are worn, the more the amount of bone available for dental implants may be reduced.